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Minneapolis Personal Injury Law Blog

Faulty auto part considered in wrongful death suits of students

Every motor vehicle accident is a serious matter, but they are especially serious when it is a fatal accident that occurs. In some instances, the accident is due to driver negligence, but there is also the possibility of faulty or defective auto parts being the cause. One particular case that is being looked at is the recent fatal truck accident that claimed the lives of five Georgia Southern University students.

Hold more than the drunk driver responsible for your accident

When getting behind the wheel of any vehicle, you are taking a risk. With the chance of an accident occurring anywhere and at anytime, you have to pay close attention to both the road and other cars while you are driving. This can become increasingly difficult if if drivers around you are impaired by alcohol. When intoxicated drivers are navigating the roadways at accelerated speeds the risk is real that you will be a victim in a DWI accident or DUI accident.

Seeking compensation after a car accident

Driving a car involves a lot more than simply placing your foot on the gas and steering. You need to be alert, aware and cautious when behind the wheel. Even though people know that one important thing to remember when driving is to keep their eyes on the road, they may forget how quickly and easily a car accident can occur if they are not paying close attention or are distracted while driving.

What are the common causes of truck accidents?

Truck accidents can be just as dangerous as any other accident on the road. Car accidents can happen any day at anytime and so can trucking accidents. In fact, each year saferoads.org/~saferoad/truck-driver-fatigue" target="_blank" >truck accidents take the lives of over 5,000 people and leave almost 150,000 injured. There are many causes of saferoads.org/~saferoad/truck-driver-fatigue" target="_blank" >truck accidents, some of the most common being slawoffice.com/Accidents/Truck-Accidents.shtml" target="_blank" >negligent truck drivers, improper loading, defective auto parts, hazardous roadways and driving companies? policies and expectations.

Medical culture may cause safety issues for Minnesota patients

In the health care field, it is thought that advances in safety and efficiency cannot be made without a change in culture. However, some believe that technological advances could lead to the desired cultural change. In a 2005 report by VitalSmarts and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 84 percent of the doctors who were surveyed said that they had seen their coworkers take dangerous shortcuts while providing patient care.

Furthermore, 88 percent said that they worked with people who showed poor judgment. The report also found that less than 10 percent of those surveyed said that they would confront those who they saw making mistakes. This leads researchers to believe that improvements in communication and patient safety tools could reduce the number of people who die each year due to preventable medical errors. However, a follow-up study in 2010 found that even with increased technology, cultural barriers were preventing medical professionals from reporting errors.

Wrongful death lawsuit filed against Bruce Jenner

Minnesota readers may be interested to learn that relatives of a woman who was killed in a car accident that Bruce Jenner was involved in are pursuing a wrongful death lawsuit against Jenner. The accident occurred in California in February.

Video shows that Jenner caused the crash when he swerved to avoid hitting cars that were slowing down for a traffic light. He was driving a Cadillac Escalade and hauling an off-road vehicle when he rear-ended a Prius. The Prius slammed into a Lexus and drove it into traffic. The 69-year-old woman driving the Lexus then died when her vehicle was hit by an oncoming Hummer.

NHTSA 2-second rule critiqued by recent study

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recommends if a driver must look away from the road, the distraction should be limited to two seconds or fewer. However, Minnesota citizens may be interested in a study by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety that found adherence to the two-second rule may still increase the risk of becoming involved in a car accident.

In the study, using driving simulation and eye-movement tracking machines, experienced drivers were presented a scene with a potential hazard down the road. The simulation included a two-second visual interruption. When their eyes were returned to the road, they were less likely to respond in a way that effectively avoided an unsafe situation when compared to drivers who had not been distracted.

Vehicle accidents still the leading cause of injuries

Most Minnesota motorists know that driving can be a dangerous activity. However, what they may not know is that, as of 2012, car accidents were found to be the primary cause of injuries across the nation. Not only did approximately 2.5 million individuals visit the emergency room after suffering accident-related injuries in that year, more than 33,000 deaths occurred.

Alcohol and drug use appear to be major factors in the cause of accidents that involve teenagers and young adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 33 percent of deceased drivers who were between the ages of 15 and 20 had blood alcohol levels that were higher than the legal limit. Additionally, research indicates that approximately 10 percent of young drivers drink and drive. As a response, the National Transportation Safety Board has made a recommendation that would potentially lower the legal blood alcohol level from .08 to .05 percent, a move which could potentially save an estimated 500 lives or more each year.

Lung cancer screening test may have drawbacks

Individuals in Minnesota who are considering a spiral CT scan to screen for lung cancer may be interested to learn that although Medicare has approved it for a certain population of heavy smokers, not all doctors recommend the test. According to some physicians, the test returns too many false positives and detects slow-growing cancers that are not dangerous. This can result in further unnecessary testing that carries additional dangers such as a biopsy.

Medicare has approved the test for individuals aged 55 to 77 who have smoked the equivalent of a pack a day or more for 30 years. In part, the approval is due to a 2011 study showing that spiral CT scans can reduce the incidence of death due to lung cancer by 20 percent. However, almost 25 percent of the study participants had false positives. In the 2011 report, the scans were studied by highly skilled radiologists, risks were clearly explained to participants and doctors were careful about using invasive follow-up methods. However, some doctors argue that these conditions might not be replicated in a typical doctor's office.

Speedway worker killed in guest driver crash

On April 12, the operations manager for the Richard Petty Driving Experience and Exotic Driving Experience at the Walt Disney World Speedway in Florida was killed in a car crash. The race track is designed to be an opportunity for regular people to get the experience of driving a racecar. This accident demonstrates the dangers that driving presents even in controlled conditions.

The crash occurred when the guest driver lost control of a Lamborghini and hit the guardrail. The driver and passenger were both wearing seat belts. The cause of the accident was not immediately identified. The driver was treated at the hospital for minor injuries.

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